Grackle & Sun

Archive for the tag “onion skins”

Knit|tinK: EarthSea Socks

These were a long time coming. Slow knitter, frequent tinker = Me. Remember when I dyed some sock yarn with black beans? I finally got that yarn knitted up into some socks. Took a while, because I played around with different construction, and ultimately changed needle size entirely. And, you know, I moved and they sat in a box for a while until I dug them out a couple weeks ago and started over again. Moving is bad for craftal expediency.

These socks were knit toe up on 2 circulars, two-at-a-time. I always begin toe-up socks with a Turkish cast-on. It is my favoritest ever—so easy to do and, most importantly, very easy to remember how to do. Mind like a sieve. Then I knit my standard Super Rounded Toe which goes something like this:

Part One:
After casting on a reasonable amount of stitches (I cast on 9 stitches per side for a total of 18 stitches, and I wear a US size 9 shoe), increase 4 stitches every row until 1/2 the number of needed increases are made. The increases are made at the beginning and end of each half of the sock—2 stitches on the instep and 2 stitches on the sole.

I do my increases like this:

Row one: K1, Inc, knit however many, Inc, K1 (repeat for second needle)
Row two: K3, Inc, knit however many, Inc, K3 (repeat for second needle)

Rinse, repeat.

EZ’s backward loop cast-on and the lifted increase both work very well. I did an EZ increase for the first set of increases and lifted increases after that.

Part Two: 
Increase in the same manner every other row until only 3 increase rows are needed.

Part Three: 
After last increase row from Part 2, knit 2 rows plain. Increase, then knit 3 rows plain. Increase, then knit 4 rows plain. Increase one last time. Then carry on with the sock.

This method works really well for making a nice rounded toe as opposed to the typical pointy toe that many sock recipes call for. Below you can see the difference between a standard toe and my Super Rounded Toe that I did for Dave’s Business Socks:

And then for some extra fun, I did something different for these socks that I’ve never tried before—I knit afterthought heels. It was convenient because I got to the heels while we were at a Comic Con with the kids, and I really didn’t want to stop knitting, which I would have had to do for any other heel type. Mind like a sieve, remember? However, I grossly underestimated the amount of waste yarn I’d need to mark my placement for the heels and had to improvise in order to survive. Not much yarn to be had at a Comic Con.  I did, however, find a plastic bag that someone left on a bench. So I ripped a long strip off of it, gave it some twist, and continued knitting merrily on my way. You do what you gotta do out in the wild.

A word about afterthought heels. EZ (Elizabeth Zimmermann, the Great and Powerful Oz) only gives an outline for how to do this method, requiring, as she does, for us to use our own brains. So I did some interweb research to try to find out more information as to avoid unnecessary and repeated tinkage. One can but try. In particular, I wanted to know exactly where the waste yarn (or for the very brave, the cutting!) should be placed. The interwebz proved very vague on this point. My inclination was to place the waste yarn in the same location where one would start a Sweet Tomato Heel–just before the ball of the heel directly below the crease where the ankle turns into the instep. I found one reference that agreed with this placement, and so I ran with it. Which was a good call, because it fit perfectly.

Then I knit up to the top, added some ribbing and finished with EZ’s sewn bind-off, which again, is my favoritest.

A note on the yarn at this point: Argh. It turns out that ammonia is a pretty harsh modifier. There was breakage within the skein, but only where I modified it with ammonia. Those are the greenish coloured sections. Clearly I applied it too strong for too long. Lesson learned. Because of the number of places where I had to piece the yarn back together (nothing crazy, but enough to be annoying), I don’t expect these to hold up too long.

After the bind off, went back and picked up the stitches on either side of the plastic bag waste yarn. Then I snipped and removed the waste yarn (easier said than done) and was left with the sole stitches (half of the total stitches) on two needles.

At this point, I had to experiment a little bit. In my reading about afterthought heels, one complaint I encountered was that the heel didn’t fit well—specifically, that it pulled too tight across the instep. My first thought for correcting this was to add some short rows in the corners on each side in order to add a bit more depth. I tried this, and while it added the needed depth, it also created a little puckery pocket on each side of the heel. Boooo! That was not attractive. Tink!

I fixed the problem by picking up additional stitches in each corner (4 on each side) and then knitting 5 rows plain before beginning the decreases for the heel. This worked beautifully. The afterthought heel is essentially a toe. Yup. You knit a toe where the heel is and, miracle of miracles, it fits.  After knitting 5 rows plain, I began decreasing 4 stitches every other row. Just like on the toe, these were done at each corner of each half of the sock, leaving a knit stitch worked at the end: K1, K2tog, knit however many, K2tog, K1. I did not do matched decreases, I just did K2tog. It works fine. When I got to the last few rows, I decreased every row until I had 9 stitches on each needle (18 total).

Then I committed the Kitchener Stitch.

Here are the finished socks:

I was skeptical about how the afterthought heels would fit, but they’re actually really comfortable. The only thing I don’t like about them is the impossible donkey ears of the Kitchener grafting. I worked the first two and last two stitches together to improve the issue, but it doesn’t entirely correct it.  See what I mean?

In the future, I think I’d try a star decrease pattern on the heel instead.

It was interesting to see how my haphazard over-dye job knit up on these socks. What is most curious is that one sock is quite a bit darker than the other. I want to learn more about dyeing for different striping patterns. More to play with. :D

As always, tinks on me. ;)  Tune in next time for some cute baby knits.

 

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Knit|tinK: A Witch’s House Socks

a witch's house socks 1-22-2013 3-42-11 PM

It took me quite a while to figure out what I wanted to knit with all the yarn samples I dyed on Dye Day #1, but it finally came to me in a semi-blinding flash:  house socks. But not just any house socks.  I wanted to knit a pair of house socks like I imagine Tiffany Aching or Nanny Ogg wearing—thick and warm, functional yet quirky.  If you aren’t familiar with Tiffany Aching or Nanny Ogg, they are two characters from one of my favourite series of books ever in the history of the history:  The Wee Free Men, A Hat Full of Sky, Wintersmith, and I Shall Wear Midnight—all by the amazing author Terry Pratchett.  I will not wax on about the books here, but suffice it to say that they have depths, and although I do not call myself “witch”, if I were to be a witch, I’d want to be Tiffany Aching.

So.  Socks.  Here they are.

a witch's house socks 1-22-2013 3-39-28 PMKnit toe-up using my trusty go-to sock knitting formula:  Turkish cast-on, my super-easy-super-rounded toe, Cat Bordhi’s Sweet Tomato Heel, Techknitting’s ribbing transition row, and Elizabeth Zimmermann’s sewn bind off.  I meant to do jogless stripes on these, but I totally forgot.  Lol.

a witch's house socks 1-20-2013 11-03-53 AMI went for a thicker stripe on these—8 rows.  It not only had the look I wanted, but it meant weaving in fewer ends.  I love stripes, but, man, I always forget how much I hate weaving in all those ends.  I call this “stripe amnesia”.  It gets me every time.  48 ends per pair, not including the toe and cuff.  Oy!

a witch's house socks 1-13-2013 1-19-00 AMBut I really like how all of the hand dyed colours went together.  I especially like how much greener the red onion yarn looks next to some of the other colours.  Here’s the line-up:

a witch's house socks 1-22-2013 3-38-015

Starting at the toe—

  1. Birch bark overdyed with yellow onion skins
  2. Osage orange FAIL overdyed with eucalyptus exhaust
  3. Annatto seed
  4. Eucalyptus
  5. Alkanet root
  6. Red onion skins
  7. Safflower exhaust
  8. Yellow onion skins
  9. Red onion skins exhaust
  10. Alkanet root
  11. Walnut creme overdyed with annatto
  12. Birch bark overdyed with yellow onion skins
  13. Eucalyptus
  14. Yellow onion skins
  15. Annatto seed
  16. Red onion skins
  17. Elm bark
  18. Safflower exhaust
  19. Red onion exhaust
  20. Osage orange FAIL overdyed with eucalyptus
  21. Alkanet root
  22. Eucalyptus
  23. Walnut creme overdyed with alkanet
  24. Birch bark overdyed with yellow onion skins
  25. Red onion skins

When I was knitting these, I thought that I would stitch felted soles on so that I could pad around the house without worrying about wearing holes in them.  But when all was said and done, I decided that I’d like to be able to wear them in shoes, too.  So I left the felted soles off for now.  We’ll see if I change my mind.  I loved knitting worsted weight socks.  I love wearing them, too.  Super ridiculously cozy and warm.  Perfect for this cold weather.  Glad I got them done before spring!

Live happy, dye happy!   And knit happy, too!

 

 

 

At the Burrow DyeTable # Five: Red Onion Revisited

After seeing the awesome green that my class got from the red onion skin dyebath the other day, I didn’t have the heart to chuck out the exhaust.  I knew that most likely my results from the same bath, which had been sitting on the back porch for 3 days, would be quite different, but I had yarn already mordanted practically screaming at me to go play.  So, play I did.  Husband kept me company, which made the whole thing infinitely more enjoyable, and I really like dyeing, so this was pretty damn good.

And, in the middle of it all, we heard a loud noise, looked up in the sky, and saw this behemoth flying low, low, low overhead.  Unexpected, right?  It had propellers.

Alright.  Back to work.

Dye Notes:

Dyestuff:  Red onions

Parts used:  The papery outer skins

Source:  The restaurant where I work, my kitchen, and grocery store onion bins

Ratio of dyestuff to yarn:  The original dyebath was roughly a .75:1 ratio of skins to yarn.  If I were to go strictly by weight for this exhaust bath, it would be about 200g onion skins to roughly 36g yarn, which is a just about a 5.6:1 ratio.  However, since this is an exhaust bath, and I have no idea how one would even begin to calculate how much dye has already been removed from the skins, the weight of said skins is very nearly meaningless.  I wish there was some way to figure it out, but it is beyond my arithmetical skillz, of which there are few.

Yarn:  Lion Brand Fisherman’s Wool mordanted with 8% aluminum potassium sulfate and 7% cream of tartar.

Dyebath:  Added just a little glug of white distilled vinegar before heating, thinking that lowering the pH might help me get the pinks that red onion are supposed to give in a more acidic bath.  The pH at room temp. was 3.6.  Once the bath came up to temperature (195F), I remeasured the pH to be 3.4.  Initially, when the yarn was added (at room temp.), it seemed to take in the claret colour.  But as soon as the bath started heating up, it became clear that it was going to turn toward yellow.  Eeeeeenteresting….  Held the dyebath between 175F-195F for 1 hour and then let the yarn cool in the pot for several hours.

The results?  A weird burnished golden green.  Here it is straight from the dyebath:

And here is the skein after being rinsed and dried.  That is NOT pink.

It’s hard to describe just what this colour is.  The picture doesn’t capture just how much of a strange, otherworldly green cast it has.  The best way to describe it would be to call it… tarnished.  I rather like it.  But it is not what I was expecting.

_____________________________________________________

Then later the same day another little hank of premordanted yarn called to me, and I decided to bump up the pH dyebath and try it one more time.  It still seemed to have so much colour in it.  So I added enough washing soda to get the pH up to 9.4 at temperature.  The colour of the bath immediately went from red to green.

In the original dyebath, after we got the pH over 9, we saw the same colour shift of the bath, but then it turned acidic (and red) again pretty quickly.  I assumed this was because I’d left the bag of onion skins in the bath and that they were still influencing the pH.  So this time, I took the bag out before bumping up the pH. I did, however, add a few fresh red onion skins I’d snagged from the restaurant this week.  No more than a couple grams.

But it didn’t make any difference.  Even though the bath stayed green for the hour that I heated it (in the same 175-195F window). after it was left to cool overnight, the next morning it was claret red again.

The results?  Not green.  Or pink.

So what was going on here?  I must begin with the disclaimer that I have no idea.  But if I were to guess, it would be that there are a couple different components to whatever compounds are in red onion skins that make them red, and that the uptake of those components occur at different times.  It is my understanding that if you take red onion skins and make a fresh dyebath with them, and leave the bath acidic, you can get pinks on your fiber.  If you take that same fresh dyebath and make it basic instead, you will get greens on your yarn—even though the bath looks red.   And that is exactly what happened with the original bath.   The kids got green yarn.  Very green.  Clearly, in the first exhaust bath, the green dye was all but gone.  In the second bath there was none left—even though the bath was alkaline.   So, I would venture to say that making the bath alkaline is what extracts the component that dyes green, and that it is taken up before the other components that dye either pink or yellow.  I would like to try red onion again and get pink from it, because I think this would help clarify what is happening chemically in this bath.  I’m really just guessing about all of it at this point.

Any of you have experience dyeing with red onion skins?  What do you think?

Live happy, dye happy!

At the Burrow Dyetable # 3: Children’s Class

Just finished teaching a children’s coop class on natural dyeing for my local homeschooling coop group. The kids were great, the timing went perfectly, and the dyepots were awesome.  In all, it was four hours of fun work. I am very pleased, and more importantly, I think the kids had a blast.

The Prep:

I pre-scoured, weighed and divvied, and pre-mordanted (8% alum/7% CoT) all the yarn, so we were able to jump right in.   Each child (and a couple parents) got a 20g mini-skein of yarn for each dyebath.  There were 9 participants and 4 dyebaths.  It was a lot of divvying and weighing and winding.  I did it in my pajamas in the wee hours.  Good times.

The Class:

We began with an introduction to natural dyeing:  types of fiber, dyestuffs, terms, safety, and a show-and-tell with fiber, dyestuff, and dyed samples.  I even made posters with illustrations and everything.  I love teaching.  I wish I had more time to do classes like this.

We dyed with black tea (English Breakfast, 20 bags), yellow onion skins (.75:1), red onion skins (just under 1:1), and I sent them home with a bonus black beans solar dyeing project. They had fun stuffing pantyhose legs with onion skins and weighing and calculating the ratios. They really liked getting to wear the blue gloves and using the Grackle & Sun super-scientifical gear—you know, the pH meter and temperature probe. Who wouldn’t? Lol. The real winner, though, was the awesome presto-change-oh! trick with the red onion skins. The magic of a little washing soda. Red dyebath, green yarn.  Show-stopper. :D

Quick scientifical aside here:  My tapwater is pH 8.8.  The black tea dyebath dropped to a 3.4.  The yellow onion bath went down to about a 4.1.  The red onion bath was made more basic with 1/4 teaspoon of washing soda which brought the pH up to 9.4, and that instantly turned the extraction green.  But later (after about 45 min.), the dyebath was claret coloured again.  So we remeasured the pH, and it was 3.5!  But the yarn still took the green colour.  Interesting that it dropped back down though.  Will have to play with this again later.  All the dyebaths were done as a combo extraction/dyebath deal.  The yarn and dyestuff was added at the same time.

In the down time, we took a tour of my yard and learned about various native dyeplants and their proper names. We also took a tour of the Grackle & Sun DyeTable (aka, my studio space in the garage). They called it my dyer’s lair. Funny.  And true. They loved all the different extractions and experiments going on.  I love to see the inner mad scientists of 10 year olds being engaged and encouraged.

The best part was seeing how excited they got about their successful dyepots. Mad skillz little dyers. I think a couple of them are hooked. They’re already asking for more classes and planning what dyestuffs they want to try out next. Total success. :D

The results:

Sorry for the over-exposed picture. I didn’t dye any yarn myself today, and so I tried to snap a quick picture before the kiddos had to go.  The green is actually greener, and the peach is actually browner. The yellow is pretty bang-on, though. I didn’t tell them what colour they’re going to get with the black beans though. I can just imagine the surprise when they see blue yarn. Good times. Love sharing this awesomeness we call natural dyeing.

Yellow Onion—Red Onion—Black Tea

Live happy, dye happy!

Dye Day #1 Extra Credit: Black Beans

We have come to the final installment of Dye Day #1—the extra credit bonus points assignment:  Black bean dyeing.  I’d first heard of black bean dyeing on two of the natural dyeing forums I belong to on Ravelry.  I was intrigued by the beautiful blues that people were getting from this common kitchen staple.  Well, I’m half Puerto Rican, so it’s always been a staple in my kitchen (along with red beans and pinto beans and gandules and garbanzo beans…lol)  Nothing else that we were dyeing with was going to give us this colour, and I thought that it would be a fun and easy project for everyone to do on their own at home and then bring for show-and-tell on Dye Day.

None of my dyeing books had any information on dyeing with black beans, so I started combing through posts on Ravelry to get more information.  This is definitely a case where being able to see pictures helped in determining the best instructions.  On Ravelry, you can make a search pull up only the posts in a thread that have photos.   {Because Casey is a code genius and should design ALL THE WEBSITES}.  The results people got with black beans were incredibly varied—everything from pale blue to cadet blue.  I wanted the most saturated blue possible, so I read through the posts written by people who got the darkest blues in order to find what the common denominators were.  Here’s what I found:

1.  Use superwash wool mordanted with alum and cream of tartar.

Mordanted superwash wool was the only fiber that consistently achieved saturated dark blues with black beans.  Unmordanted superwash did ok, but black bean dye is fugitive, and the mordant is what gives it half a chance of not fading the first time you wash it.  Mordanted regular wool got significantly lighter blues, and unmordanted regular wool got very light blues with little staying power.  The light blue shades were pretty, but I thought that everyone would have more fun if they got something bold out of the dyepot.   All the participants were natural dyeing newbies, and I figured that the better the colour, the more successful they’d feel about their results, and the more confident they’d feel about their ability to dye on their own.

2.  Soak 4 lbs of dried black beans in water for 24-48 hours.  

It was actually pretty hard to find much specific information on dyestuff to fiber ratios.  I found a few references to soaking 4 lbs of beans for 1 skein of yarn, and I figured it seemed like a good enough amount as any.   I used a 100g skein of Knitpicks Superwash Bare, which means that I had 1814.37g dyestuff to 100g fiber.  That’s a big ratio.  Judging by the amount of dye left in the exhaust, I could easily have dyed with half that amount.  The 24-48 hour difference is for this reason:  If you want to eat the beans, which is a perfectly reasonable thing to do, you want to soak them in a kitchen-safe, non-reactive container (stainless steel pot or ceramic or glass bowl) for no more than 24 hours.  Any longer than that, and the beans get tough and start to go bad.  If you don’t want to eat your beans, then soak them in any non-reactive container (plastic bucket, stainless steel or enamel dyepot, etc) for up to 48 hours to get the most colour out of them.  Any more than 48 hours, and you’re on a one-way trip to funkytown.  They start to smell pretty fast.  Make sure you cover your beans with at least an inch or two more water than the level you expect them to expand to.  That way they stay covered.

Word to the wise:  Black beans expand to a millionty times the original volume.  No, really.  If you are going to use 4 lbs of black beans, you need a VERY LARGE pot or bucket.  If you choose not to listen to me, don’t say I didn’t warn you.  I learned the hard way.  There is still a blue spot dyed onto my kitchen floor from where the beans frothed over the pot.  Frothed.

3.  Very carefully strain off the dark liquid from the top of the beans. 

When you soak the beans, a lot of grainy particulate will accumulate in the water.  It is very important not to get this particulate in your dye liquid as it will adhere to your yarn and jack up your blue.  Most people said that they carefully ladled the dye liquid off the top of the bean pot, so as not to disturb the particulate which settled at the bottom.  That didn’t work for me, because I soaked my beans in too small a container.  They expanded like something out of a science fiction movie all the way to the top (and over) of the container.  So, I strained the whole mess through a colander into big glass jar.  I let that sit on the counter for a few hours so that the particulate would settle, and then I ladled off the dye liquid.  In retrospect, I like this method a lot better.  It was easier to ladle off the liquid without having to dodge beans, and I got more of it.  Win-win.

4.  Soak your yarn in the bean juice dye liquid for approximately 2 days.  

All the instructions I saw for black bean dyeing recommended doing it as either a cold or loosey-goosey solar dyeing process.  What I mean by that is that some people (myself included) put theirs in a glass jar in a sunny spot—not so much for the heat as for the…?  Well, it’s easy to dye in glass jars, and it’s fun to be able to see what’s going on while you do it.  It could just as easily be done in a bucket under the sink.  The one cardinal rule of black bean dyeing is that you never heat the dyebath.  I repeat, DO NOT HEAT THE DYEBATH!  It will totally jack up the colour, making it muddy and gross.  And then every time you eat frijoles negros, you’ll have negative associations with failed dyepots, and we want to avoid that.  Oh, the pH for this dyebath was 5.4.  That’s down from the pH 8.8 that my tap water measures.  By the way, if you don’t have 2 days to soak it, it should be mentioned that a substantial amount of uptake was achieved in just a few hours.  The yarn got a bit darker over the next day, but still, a good blue was had early on.

Warning:  Black bean juice gets righteously funky when it sits out for a few days.  Remember, by the time your yarn is ready, that bean juice has been stewing for 4 days.  That’s 4 days of whoa! your yarn just soaked in.  It will wash off.  But I highly recommend that you use tongs and wear gloves when you pull that skein out, because you don’t want to find out how long it will take to wash off of you.  I am quite curious to find out if this whole process could be accomplished in the refrigerator.  If so, we could avoid the fermentation and get the blue stink-free.  That would be nice.

Looks pretty, doesn’t it? I had to hold my breath while I took this shot.

So far, so good.  Easy, right?

The results?  Well, my skein looked pretty much exactly like it did in the picture above when I first took it out.

After being rinsed, hanging to dry on the back of a chair.

But I’m a curious thing, and I just couldn’t resist finding out what would happen if I modified the results in various after-dips.   I tried ammonia and copper.  Here’s what I got:

Ammonia turned the blue into a drab olivey-green colour.  Copper, however, brightened the blue up beautifully and gave it almost a violet hue.  Very pretty.  I’ll be modding black bean dyes with copper in the future for sure.  I’d also like to see how yarn premordanted with copper will turn out.  I bet it would be pretty…

But that ammonia was a mistake.   Oops.  All in the name of science, right?  So I had to fix that.  But how?  Re-acidifying those spots with vinegar did not work.  So I decided to overdye the ammonia section in the onion exhaust bath.  I am very pleased with the results!  It’s got kind of an earth-sea thing going on.  And I like how those ammonia greens now just blend the brown and the blue together.

I’m really excited to see how this knits up.  This past weekend, two of my good friends and I wen to Chicago to the Stitches Midwest convention.  This is basically a KnitCon, as my daughter calls it, where knitters and crocheters get to go geek out.  There are classes offered by mad skillz knitters and authors and a huge, huge, huge area for vendors to sell ALL THE YARNS.  Well, almost all the yarns.  Am I the only one who lusts after skeins of small batch Romney or Icelandic wool that still has bits of grass in it?  Lol.  But still, it was good times.  We just went for the day to check out the yarn market.  There were lots of gorgeous handdyed yarns.  There was quite a bit of llama and alpaca, musk ox, and bison wools.   I bought some gorgeous soft grey alpaca from Village Spinning and Weaving.  It’s a deliciously soft and lustrous natural silver grey from Peru.  We got to meet some of our fellow Ravelry friends in person, which is always fun.  Stitches!

Anyway, the rest of the trip was all about wandering around Chicago and involved lots and lots of public transit, including the 12 hours roundtrip on the Amtrak from and to St. Louis.  What does this mean?  Knitting time!  So I cast on the black bean yarn for a pair of socks.   It’s fascinating to see what pattern of striping emerges from a variegated skein.   It’s never what you think it’s going to be.  I’m also interested to see how wash- and lightfast the dye ends up being.  Will the mods effect the fastness?  I don’t know.  We’ll find out!

Live happy, dye happy!  And, as always, tinks on me!

Dye Day #1 Results: Yellow Onion Skins

Foolproof.  Easily collected.  Non-toxic.  Beautiful.  Yellow onion skins are a very satisfying dyestuff.    Definitely recommended for beginners—you’d be hardpressed to mess this up.

Dye Notes:

Dyestuff:  Yellow onions

Part used:  Dried outer skins

Source:  My kitchen and the grocery store where I used to work

Yarn:  Knitpicks Bare Superwash mordanted with 8% aluminum potassium sulfate and 7% cream of tartar; Lion Brand Fisherman’s Wool unmordanted.

Ratio of dyestuff to fiber:  I’ve seen anywhere from 1:1 to 1: .05 recommended.  However, I used everything I had (and I’d been saving them for years!): 384g of onion skins to 160g of fiber.  So, this means our ratio was over 2:1 dyestuff to fiber.

Extraction method:  We stuffed the onion skins into panty hose and simmered them for 1 hr.

Lid on top to keep the pantyhose bags from floating.

Dyebath:  We left the onion skins in the dyepot, added the fiber and simmered for about another hour.

The results?  Beautiful golden yellows and browns.

Fresh from the dyebath, superwash on the right.

I gave the Fisherman’s Wool a second dunk to darken it, and at the same time, overdyed the birch bark skein:

And for added comparison, here are my friend Kittyraja’s skeins of glory:

Both are mordanted.  The left is superwash.  The white spots are where her yarn was tied a little too tightly.  Lesson learned—making a resist on yarn while dyeing is EASY.

There was one more adventure in onion dyeing on Dye Day #1, but that story will have to wait for later.  Until then,

Live happy, dye happy!

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