Grackle & Sun

Archive for the category “unlabeled goodness”

Instead

Below follow the resolutions I made for 2016.  I don’t want to make any new ones without first revisiting last year’s to see what of this list I did or did not accomplish. A review, if you will, of imperfection and humanness, good intentions and fickle will. Let’s take a peek and reflect, shall we?

  • Become best friends with my body–maybe do some juicing, a little cleansey+detoxy sort of thing, and (ahem) start working out again. Easy, right?  Well, I did start off last year with a detox, so technically, check mark. The rest is a long story for another time–but the short story basically involves me being tested for multiple neurological diseases and ultimately being diagnosed with Lyme. Again.
  • Take trumpet lessons. Didn’t happen. But I did learn the C major scale and played a rousing rendition of ‘Happy Birthday’ to myself when I turned 42 last year. And I’m signed up for lessons which begin later this month. So… I’ll call this one good.

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  • Grow a bunch of awesome seedlings for the garden.  Sadly, no. But not for a lack of trying. Things started off really well, and then one day, after I’d moved the seed trays outside, it rained, filling up the trays. I didn’t find them until the next day, and they were very, very drowned. But I drained them off and thought maybe they could be saved. Then it got balls hot 2 days later and baked the shit out of them. It was terribly sad and frustrating. The garden still grew things, though, as it is wont to do when I throw seeds at it and then get out of the way. Points for trying, right?

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  • Establish proper dye, herb, and medicinal garden beds. Alas, no, as all those seedlings perished in the above catastrophe. GIANT SADFACE. I did, however, successfully establish a Missouri native wildflower garden in one corner of the vegetable garden space. It is very pretty. This is a native copper iris.

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  • Do this fun Plant Ally Project Challenge.  I did not do this. Instead, I kept the tab open on my laptop for almost a solid year and stared at it every day thinking, tomorrow. Many great things are never done one day at a time.
  • Two words: Dye. Yarn. My great disappointment. We won’t talk about it. I have yarn washed, tied, and ready to go; buckets of poke juice sitting in the garage staring at me petulantly. Sometimes your groove gets shelved as you run around putting out fires instead of tending the creative fire. Nothing to do but be kind to yourself and allow things to unfold when they will. I love dyeing, and I could not push this.
  • Have the soil at the farm tested.  Nope, but for good reason! This year, I went to several intensive grower’s conferences. Major research mode. Two were for growing native elderberries, and the other was for holistic orchard practices. Both Terry and Michael were absolutely fantastic, and I learned so much important information–including what specifically to test for when establishing orchards. So, I am now properly prepared to do the soil sampling and have contacted my county extension already.

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  • De-fence the pasture pastures. Re-fence the pastures.  Yes! I didn’t get all of them, but I did take down the worst offender. And now that I know how to do it, the rest should be much easier. We decided not to re-fence any pastures with permanent fencing, and instead my dad has invested in some good movable electric netting for the sheep. This has worked remarkably well. I’m planning on purchasing the next set of fencing so that we have more flexibility for group separation.

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  • Begin intensive grazing. Of the sheep. Not of me. Slowly, but surely, this is happening–especially with the aid of the portable fencing. There is a learning curve for sure, and until I’m on the farm full-time, it won’t happen quite the way it needs to. But improvements are being made. Check.

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  • Start drawing again. Play with the inks (that I’ve had for 5 years).
  • Fix my sewing machine. Sew.  No and no. Although, I did figure out what was wrong with the sewing machine. And knowing is half the battle, right?
  • Learn how to make tinctures and more medicinal tea blends.   I worked on this quite a bit. I’ve done a lot of reading on medicinal herbs this year. And listened to some excellent talks, as well. I made several tinctures and tea blends this year. Check.
  • Learn how to can, freeze, and dehydrate.  Canning and freezing, no. But I did do some fruit dehydrating. Love me some dried mango.
  • Take more walks. Yes, I did this. Most of my walks were taken with my best friend, Ronin, who unfortunately went on to the great gig in the sky in November, after a short but sucktastic tangle with metastatic lung cancer. My heart hurts. I still feel his spirit with me, but my walks will never be the same.

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  • Paddle the MR340.  
  • Prolly ought to practice paddling.  I did not paddle the MR340. Instead, I learned something about myself: I am not a competitive person. Not with this kind of thing, anyway. I’d really like to paddle the length of the 340, but not in some frenetic, heat stroke inducing, sleep deprived, timed contest. That sounds fucking awful. I am the tortoise, not the hare. I did manage to go paddling a few times. Slowly, with much looking around and dipping my fingers in the water.

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  • Sprout broccoli. Eat the sprouted broccoli.
  • Make water kefir. Drink the water kefir.  Yes and yes. Although, I had a difficult time keeping my water kefir grains alive for more than 4 or 5 batches at a time. What I did make turned out good, though. And broccoli sprouts are zesty and delicious. And full of sulforaphane, which is exceptionally good for you.

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  • Figure out what I want to do when I grow up.  I feel like I’m getting closer…
  • Send postcards to friends and family.  Sorry, fam. I did email more, though.
  • Go on a silent retreat. I wish.
  • Write down the stories in my head. Stories, no. But I did write down more of my thoughts and kept a bit of a journal. Occasionally.
  • Clean the basement. LOLOLOLOL.  The answer is still LOLOLOLOLOL.
  • Welcome the magic in my life. This was a priority, and I worked very hard to keep a committed daily practice in motion. Even when I didn’t feel like it. Kind of like flossing. You just get up and do it no matter what. This daily dedication has been a real blessing and a true lesson in the depth to be gained from a slow, sustained practice.

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  • PLAY MORE. And relax, everything is ok.  This one I think I finally remembered how to do.  This might be my best accomplishment all year.

Even though 2016 was a year that was in many respects quite tragic, it also brought many, many good things. We talk about a year as though it was an entity that acted upon us, instead of us acting within it–a measure of time that holds our deeds, good and bad. I have no resolutions for 2017. For me, they end up being To Do lists anyway. Instead, I simply want to remember that while I may not control everything around me, my circumstances or the actions of others, I am always in control of my actions and my attitude–the two things that count. So no matter what I might accomplish this next year, may I always reflect with honesty, discern with wisdom, act with integrity, and above all, respond with lovingkindness and good cheer. Because at the end of it all, it will be the love and kindness and good cheer that will be remembered. Not cleaning the basement.

Happy 2017 to you all! May this year bring you many blessings–good company, good food, good health, and grand adventures!

d

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Late blooming

Fall flora on the farm.

Feeling nostalgic for my childhood on said farm.

Days when the land and the sun and the wind held all the magic I needed.

Now I try to set aside the running list of things to get done,

and instead walk my old haunts

so that I may bring together the wild heart that beats both here

and in me.

lateboneset

late boneset (eupatorium serotinum)

purpleboneset

blue boneset (eupatorium coelestinum)

jewelweed

jewelweed (impatiens capensis)

perilla

perilla (perilla frutescens)

rhusaromatica

fragrant sumac (rhus aromatica)

goldenrod

goldenrod (solidago)

mushroomclusters

i really need to learn some mushroom id skills (fungus superfunkus)

thistle

thistle (either cirsium vulgare or cirsium altissimum)

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no idea. plant id book came up nil. and what does that mean for us to see without naming?

Resolute

I love this time of year, when everything is turned to browns and greys; when the earth shows its bones, its humbling architecture. 20151220_103014The weather is changeable where we are. Christmas day was a balmy 60 degrees this year. Strange, but lovely. Then it was all thunderstorms and tornadoes. And flooding, lots and lots of flooding. Not what one would expect at the end of December, even in the Midwest.  Now it’s cold. Finally. And still flooding.

We took advantage of the winter reprieve to tend to the garden–something which got lost in the shuffle this fall. Husband did a rough turning over with the tractor, but before he did, I made sure to clear out any big stuff that was left–a missed tomato cage, dried okra stalks, pavers, and… Look what I found!

20151220_104242Yeah. That’s a radish bigger than my head! And you know what they say–never eat anything that’s bigger than your head and certainly not three that are bigger than your boots… Should I be a radish farmer or what?20151220_104333

Time to sweep out the old year and welcome in the new. I am so excited for this new year, I can hardly stand it. I’ve got a list of all the things I want to do:

  1. Become best friends with my body–maybe do some juicing, a little cleansey+detoxy sort of thing, and (ahem) start working out again. Easy, right?
  2. Take trumpet lessons.
  3. Grow a bunch of awesome seedlings for the garden.
  4. Establish proper dye, herb, and medicinal gardens.
  5. Do this fun Plant Ally Project Challenge.
  6. Two words: Dye. Yarn.
  7. Have the soil at the farm tested.
  8. De-fence the pastures. Re-fence the pastures.
  9. Begin management intensive grazing.  Of the sheep, not me.
  10. Start drawing again. Play with the inks (that I’ve had for 5 years).
  11. Fix my sewing machine. Sew.
  12. Learn how to make tinctures and more medicinal tea blends.
  13. Learn how to can, freeze, and dehydrate.
  14. Take more walks.
  15. Paddle the MR340.
  16. Prolly ought to practice paddling.
  17. Sprout broccoli. Eat the sprouted broccoli.
  18. Make water kefir. Drink the water kefir.
  19. Figure out what I want to do when I grow up.
  20. Send postcards to friends and family.
  21. Go on a silent retreat.
  22. Write down the stories in my head.
  23. Clean the basement. LOLOLOLOL.
  24. Welcome the magic in my life.
  25. PLAY MORE. And relax, everything is ok.

It all looks so simple in a list. Who knows how much of it will happen. Doesn’t matter. I used to care about checking things off the list, but then I realized that it’s much nicer to just let the list show me what categories of things I’m finding important and/or need to work on. Maybe I’ll chuck through it, maybe I’ll struggle. But I will remain resolute that however it goes, it goes in good cheer and thankfulness.

So, friends, what hopes do you have for the New Year? What fantastical feats do you wish to accomplish? What mad new skillz do you dream of acquiring? What do you secretly dream will happen in the upcoming months? Tell me, tell me!

Have a very happy New Year!  May it be filled with many blessings–good health, good company, and loads of good luck.

–d

 

 

 

 

 

Wait for It….

I missed the lunar eclipse. Would not really have been able to see it from here anyway. So I slept.

And then I woke up, and during the course of my day, saw all these other wonderful things instead!

Overnight, all the violets in the world bloomed.

The woods behind my house full of Spring Beauty, Claytonia virginica.

A miniature field of grape hyacinths, which smell absolutely divine–from a close distance.

Always happy to see these sunny little lions.

Chickweed, Stellaria media. Of course, not a weed at all, but a medicinal soother.

May…

Apples…

Un…

Furling.

Maybe this year I’ll get to taste one…

A nibble-on Trillium.

Native American fishing net plummets. Who knew? I did not.

Thank you, local Conservation Center!

And, my friends, for the best part of the day.  I took a lovely afternoon drive–windows down, Bjork blasting her quirky Icelandic heart out on my speakers.  A drive which led to my knitting buddy’s alpaca farm. I feel that should be in all caps.

ALPACA FARM FIELD TRIP!

Aw, yeah. That’s right. All the fun enhappenated.

Oh, the squishy, springy, lustrous wonderfulness. I touched a lot of alpaca today.

 I got kissed by an alpaca. No joke. It’s how they say hi, things are cool. They have very soft noses. This is not the alpaca I bumped noses with. It’s hard to take a picture of an alpaca when her face is in your face, so Sweetums remains unseen.

They will be shorn next week. Ready for the heat of a Missouri summer. Their teeth will be filed (as the photo above shows, it’s time) and their toes trimmed. All in 8 minutes per animal, so I’m told. Professional shearers know their stuff, hunh?

Look at that coat! Practically begging to be spun. I’ve never wanted a wheel as much as I did today. I’ve got to start spinning.

The biggest surprise to me was how stout alpaca are. They are muscley little things under all that gorgeous, sproingy wool.

They are also very curious and personable. Really delightful souls.

Alpaca. Best field trip ever.

Knit|tinK: Sweet Little Shawl

All that ranting and moaning about not being able to knit apparently unblocked my mojo. I decided the next day that I needed to cast on a quick little project for a gift I had promised a friend months ago. I found the perfect pattern in Susan Galbraith’s Sumptuous Stripes Shawlette.

The shawl is a gift for a teenage girl, and so I decided that making it easy to wash would be the kind thing to do. I used two skeins of my go-to favourite “I’m making this for a kid” yarn, which is Lion Brand Wool-Ease in worsted weight heathered solids. We all have our guilty knitting pleasures, and Wool-Ease is mine. It wears well, and you can chuck it into the washer and dryer many, many, many times, and it comes out looking like new. The natural-coloured Romney wool snob in me is stamping her foot in the corner. I am ignoring her.

This took all of two days to finish. I had fun learning how to knit on an edging, which somehow I had never done before. Susan was super helpful in answering my questions when I couldn’t quite visualize where I was in space and time. It all came together without a hitch. Well, almost. The Universe had a hand in this project, of course. See, the funny part about the whole thing is that in order to get the drape I was looking for, I had to go up in needles size. To size 11. So, two projects going on size 11s at the same time. Ha! That’s what I get for bitching.

The only other size 11 needles I had in the house were a pair of old aluminum straights. Not even all that straight–one has a bend in it either from use or maybe from being sat on… I was NOT going to buy another pair of circs in a size I abhor, and so I used the straights. I crammed all 199 stitches onto those cold, chubby, metal sticks, and I made it happen.

Turned out pretty cute.  Thanks to awesome teenage daughter who modeled for my “knit cred”.

I have a thing for knitting stripes. In part, it is due to my “stripe amnesia”–that’s what it’s called when you forget how horrible it is to weave in a millionty ends. BUT, this pattern had no end weaving whatsoever due to the very clever, yet simple, way the colours are carried and changed. I also love the way the edging took care of binding off the live stitches and helped the stockinette to lay down nice and flat. Lovely. Especially since the downfall of Wool-Ease is its lack of blockability.

There we go. Knitting success. Mojo unblocked. Needles flying like the wind.

Aaaaaand… I’m back to the afghan. :D

As always, tinks on me.

Mookies and the New Year

I hope you have all had a very happy Elevensies and that the New Year brings you much happiness, many blessings, and every good thing. Since we recently moved a couple hours away from most of our friends, we realized that we would not be able to celebrate Togetherness (aka, EmpanadaFest) in the way that we used to do–with a big open house and mountains of empanadillas–what with the distance and drive time in poor weather. So instead we had a low-key four-of-us New Year’s Eve and Togetherness Day today. In addition to beating pots and pans and sweeping out the old year and lighting incense for the Ancestors, it may have involved watching The Big Lebowski. It also involved food.

I never thought I’d have a recipe on my blog, lol, but here goes. As part of that celebration, I made a recipe that I’ve been working on for a little bit now. It’s a delicious paleo take on a cookie-muffin hybrid love child. I basically modelled it after a traditional chocolate chip cookie recipe, but substituted paleo ingredients, and lo, it worked. Yes, it’s just that easy! Fool’s luck and all that. The muffin tin is key for achieving maximum brownage. Just like the corner pieces are the best part of brownies, the perfectly browned exterior is the best part of a cookie. Caramelized sugars are a gift. But first, dude, can I just say that food photography is wicked hard. My hat is off to all of you brilliant bloggers who take beautiful food photos. That shit takes skill.

World, I present to you…

Mookies!

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups blanched almond flour*
  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • roughly 1 tsp of baking soda or baking powder**
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 2 sticks of butter, softened***
  • 1/2 cup honey****
  • generous splash of vanilla extract (I use 2-3 tsp, because it’s mas deliciouser)
  • 3 eggs******
  • one bag gluten, dairy, and soy-free chocolate chips (ie, Enjoy Life chocolate chunks or mini-chips)

Quick Asterisked Asides:

  • *Raw almond meal works, too, but is not as elegantly foo-foo.
  • **Technically, you should use baking soda because pH. However, I suffer the misfortune of being able to taste baking soda in baked goods (it’s a distractingly gross metallic taste that makes me want to wipe my tongue clean with a sponge, and doesn’t that sound fun?), so I always and only use baking powder in recipes. Some would have you believe that interchanging these does not work, but I have yet to experience any baking FAILS due to this exchange.
  • ***Since this is a Paleo recipe, I am obligated by law to tell you that this butter should be grassfed if you’ve the dosh for it.
  • ****Supporting your local bee population and local apiarist(s) by purchasing local honey is an honourable deed.
  • ******I love my chickens!

Instrucciones:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Grease a mini-muffin pan with butter or coconut oil or some other culinary unguent of your choice.
  3. In a large bowl, beat wet ingredients until you feel comfortable that you’ve done a pretty good job at mixing it all together. Some of you may perform this step with a hand-mixer or a posh standing mixer. That’s cool. I’m sure it’ll work just fine. I use a fork. It’s a special magical fork that came into my life when I met my dear husband (of now 18 years!). It was, and I do not joke, his only fork when he was a hip young bachelor living in a studio apartment at Uni. Lol. Anyway, it is known as The Fork, and it is mine now, mwah-ha-ha-ha, and I use it to mix everything. If I can’t mix it with The Fork, I don’t make it. And I’ve made angel food with this fork, so… One does not need fancy equipment to make deliciousness. That’s all I’m sayin’. Here is a picture of the fork to inspire you:
  4. In case you are unsure, the wet ingredients are the Butter, Eggs, Honey, and Vanilla. Which could be a recipe on its own, right? Om nom nom. But don’t stop there…
  5. Add dry ingredients (flours, salt, leavening) to wet ingredients. Beat until well incorporated.
  6. Your dough should be slightly loose, but not at all runny.
  7. Add chocolate chips and fold in with a rubber/silicon spatula.
  8. Use a spoon or something to fill the mini-muffin pan bits with the dough.
  9. Bake for 12-15 minutes depending on your oven. It’s 13 minutes to heaven in my oven. ;)
  10. Cool for a few minutes before trying to remove the mookies from the muffin pan. Cool completely on rack.

Mookies cooling. Be patient.

Two quick alternatives for you:

Alternative #1–I’ve made this recipe with 2 eggs instead of 3. It makes for a drier, more cookie-like crumb. Don’t overbake.

Alternative #2–Leave out the chocolate chips and make thumbprint mookies instead! After spooning the dough into the mini-muffin pan, use a spoon (or your thumb, for authenticity) to make divots in the center of each mookie. Fill with jam of your choice and then bake. Super delicious, like, whoa. Great with tea.

Enjoy!

Thanks and More Thanks

Synchronicitous (it has precedent) with Thanksgiving, Knitty Nerdy and Natural nominated me for the One Lovely Blog award. Very kind, and I am very grateful. Thank you!

So, here is how the game is played:

  1. Thank and link back to the person who nominated you.
  2. List the rules and display the award.
  3. Include seven delightful facts about yourself.
  4. Nominate 15 other bloggers and let them know about the award.
  5. Follow the blogger who nominated you.

Numbers 1, 2, and 5 are complete. Now for number 3…

Seven Completely Random Facts About Me:

  1. I am the seventh of eight children.
  2. I am a very good swimmer.  I am terrible at jumping, though. Really. I’m talking a couple inches off the ground, max. I’m convinced that maybe I have extra gravity or something.
  3. After reading a lot of serious non-fiction, I like to take a brain-break by binging on romance novels.
  4. In addition to reading everything I can get my hands on about herbal medicines and making tinctures and tonics and such, am researching how to make my own digestive bitters.  More on that later.
  5. Lately I’ve been dreaming about South Africa. Literally dreaming about South Africa. Why?
  6. I hate getting wet in the rain.  Actually, to be more specific, I hate being in wet clothes. For any reason.
  7. My 3 favorite food textures are chewy, creamy, and gritty. I can handle slimy, like okra or oysters, but am completely undone by soggy.  Soggy is terrible.

And finally, for the best part, number 4–nominating other blogs that I find wonderful and lovely. I do hope that you will go check them out. They are each unique and interesting for many reasons and very deserving of a visit or a follow.

  1. The Procrastinator Dyer’s Diary  Elena does marvelous work with natural dyeing and eco-printing. I always learn something new when I read her posts.
  2. Amaryllis Log Cathe is a brilliant photographer and crafter and has a keen eye for detail and design.  Her posts are always thoughtful and a delight for the eye.
  3. Astitchmatism is a riot wrapped in knitting, dyeing, sewing, and home renovation. Just go read about veggie weenies. And the weird shit found behind radiators. :D
  4. The Course of Our Seasons Kathleen is a fellow Missouri Ozark dweller, and while her photos show familiar landscapes, her poetry reminds me to slow down and look at the world around me with an open heart.
  5. Hotel Vast Horizon Aidan is awesome. I love the artistry and skill of his metalwork and very much love reading his thoughts on dirt, sorcery, and being.
  6. Plantfolk Apothecary Kate Clearlight has her toes planted firmly in the ground and her heart open to the magic of plants. Inspiring infusions, elixirs, and tonics abound here.
  7. Shamana Flora Darcey Blue is a plant poet. I love her heartfelt honesty and desert plant wisdom. Her Pinyon Pine Resin Salve is on my plant medicine wishlist.
  8. Textileshed Swantje makes beautiful patchwork pieces, has mad knitting skillz (check out her Celtica!) and makes screenprinting look like a total blast.
  9. Shroomworks Ann creates dyepot magic with things like hydnellum aurantiacum and sarcodon fuscoindicus. In other words, fungi. Unbelievable colours. This is something I would love to learn, and this blog is inspiring.
  10. Threadborne Wendy is an accomplished fiber artist and teacher, and I greatly admire her work. I am fascinated by her eco-printed books. And her kale garden.
  11. Woollenflower Julia takes absolutely gorgeous photos of all good things–plants, crafts, dyework, and journeys in interesting places. Truly beautiful posts.
  12. Old Ways Herbal Juliette writes about making and using plant medicines. Her posts are very grounded and fantastically informative, and they instill enthusiasm and confidence in walking the herbalist path.
  13. Trembling Inside the Cocoon Julie is badass. She weaves, knits, sews, spins & dyes with tremendous skill. I am always in awe of her projects.
  14. Woolwinding Kate of the Welsh hills has the one and only blog where, depending on the day, you can read about coloured sheep, archeology, nanny tea (don’t ask), 80’s knit fashions, or the evils of toecovers. Enjoy.
  15. Big House, Little Prairie My friend, Laura, has an uncanny knack for uncovering the heart of things.  She writes with great thoughtfulness and eloquence about homesteading, crafting, family, and life.

Big thanks to all of my blog-friends and followers.  I  love the wonderful conversations that take place in our little corner of this digital world. And though we are spread out all around the world (which is pretty cool, I think), I appreciate the community that is created when we get together and share our stories. Thank you.

 

There Has Been

Traveling to northerly places (and giant orange asterisks)…

Leaves leaving…

Restless snappers chasing reflections…

Giant squashes waiting to roast in my oven…

Much needed rain and rain and rain…

Mysterious nightshades and their thousand lanterns…

Ordinary, not ever ordinary…

Okra…

Things to remind me of childhood…

The Mighty Mississippi…

Furious weaving everywhere…

Oars Paddles in the water…

Long walks in the woods with my best buddy…

Making friends with the genius loci by making apologies for trashy people…

Bunches and bunches of marigolds…

And settling in to autumn.

Lay in the grass, bask in the sun, work hard, remember to play, dream vividly, wake happily, eat lots of soup–even for breakfast. And if you’re lucky, knit a row or two. ;)

 

Talk about the weather

February is not cooperating with my plans for an early spring.  As I speak, we’re getting pelted–again–with a delightful “wintery mix”, which is inconvenient because I want to plant all the things now!  Anyone else eyeing their seed catalogs with something bordering on lust?  I’m laying out gardens in my mind and dreaming of hugelkultur.  We’ve got tons of downed branches and trees, and I’m going to hugel the hell out of them—as soon as it stops snowing.  I love winter.  I really do.  For about a month and a half.  But come February, I can’t decide if I’m supposed to be learning about patience or resignation.

The weather here is very changeable and can be seen either as respite or a tease depending on your point of view. The other day it was 50 degrees and foggy.  Very beautiful.  The back and forth weather can make it difficult to know when to when to get going in the spring.  It is not uncommon to have 80 or 90 degree days in April and then get a frost in May.  And then straight back to 90 by June.  You just never know.  So, I’m going to start some seeds indoors to satisfy this need to see green things growing and just roll with the weather.

The nice thing about winter is that it very naturally allows time for contemplation, reflection, and sussing out ones thoughts and ideas.  This winter has given me a lot of quiet time outside, for which I am very thankful.  I’ve been turning my mind to sustainability, permaculture, conservation, and how to be a good steward of the land and what is on it.  I’ll be writing more on these things, hopefully as thoughts shift in to actions.

In other news, the move is done.  Huzzah!

So, all you gardeners out there… favorite gardening method?  Tricks you couldn’t believe you’d ever gardened without?  Do you start indoors or direct-sow?  Anyone try hugelkultur?  Raised beds?  Rows?  Anyone done any vermiculture or other types of composting?  Tell all about it!

 

 

 

The end is near (dear god, let it be near)

Months of collecting boxes.

Ignoring the boxes.

Avoiding the boxes.

Staring antagonistically at the boxes.

Resigning one’s will to the boxes.

But not liking it.

Packing after a long day at work.

Not packing after a long day at work.

Looking at the calendar.

Panic-packing.

Neatly labeling boxes.

Labeling boxes.

Throwing random stuff in boxes and not caring if they get taped shut, much less labeled.

A yard sale.

Donations.

Still realizing the weight of too many possessions.

Mentally drafting future blog posts about starting a minimalist lifestyle.

Back to packing.

Loading said possessions into a very large truck.

Running out of room.

Recognizing one’s deficiencies in spatial awareness.

Pianos are big, but necessary.

Lawn mowers and flower pots don’t fit tidily into boxes.

They will have to go on round two.

{Head desk}

Very large truck loses brakes and steering on the highway.

Dangerously close call.

Tow truck.

Stuff still on truck.

Can’t be unloaded for a week.

Schedule blown to hell.

Another lesson in how I do not control the universe.

Deep breathing.

Soothing thoughts.

Still have to pack up the other truck due to the necessity of pianos and lawn mowers and tools and bicycles.

Don’t hyperventilate.

Will unload all earthly possessions on Saturday.

On Sunday will weep for joy.

And laugh.

 

 

 

 

 

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